knowhomo:

LGBTQ* Advice, Insight and Education
How Educators Can Help:
1.) Treat the topic of sexual orientation as you would an other human difference
2.) Illustrate ways in which diversity has had a positive effect on our culture
3.) Do not allow students to use names such as “fag,” “butch,” “dyke,” “homo,” etc. in a negative fashion. Treat these words the same way you give notice to ethnic or racial slurs. Create a safe space for discussion.
4.) Let others show that derogatory gestures and jokes are not amusing — they cause pain
5.) Be away that some LGBTQ* students are very often uncomfortable, invisible, isolated and need acceptance from you 
6.) Some LGBTQ* students will probably not admit to being LGBTQ* due to denial, need to conform or personal acknowledgement. Don’t confront these students! Be an ally and allow them time.
7.) You can convey respect and show that each student is valued for characteristics within his/her control.
8.) Sexual orientation is a minor (but important) part of a person’s existence and should not be overly emphasized.
9.) When you speak to someone it is important to remember that that person may be indeed related to the “invisible” minority and can easily be hurt. Be a good friend. Do not use a student or fellow peer as examples without their permission.
10.) If a student tells you he/she is LGBTQ*, thank the person for trusting you and keep it to yourself. If a student needs help, the school psychologist or social worker will be available and the information will be kept confidential.
(Taken from a university Safe Haven manual. Picture source unknown.)

knowhomo:

LGBTQ* Advice, Insight and Education

How Educators Can Help:

1.) Treat the topic of sexual orientation as you would an other human difference

2.) Illustrate ways in which diversity has had a positive effect on our culture

3.) Do not allow students to use names such as “fag,” “butch,” “dyke,” “homo,” etc. in a negative fashion. Treat these words the same way you give notice to ethnic or racial slurs. Create a safe space for discussion.

4.) Let others show that derogatory gestures and jokes are not amusing — they cause pain

5.) Be away that some LGBTQ* students are very often uncomfortable, invisible, isolated and need acceptance from you 

6.) Some LGBTQ* students will probably not admit to being LGBTQ* due to denial, need to conform or personal acknowledgement. Don’t confront these students! Be an ally and allow them time.

7.) You can convey respect and show that each student is valued for characteristics within his/her control.

8.) Sexual orientation is a minor (but important) part of a person’s existence and should not be overly emphasized.

9.) When you speak to someone it is important to remember that that person may be indeed related to the “invisible” minority and can easily be hurt. Be a good friend. Do not use a student or fellow peer as examples without their permission.

10.) If a student tells you he/she is LGBTQ*, thank the person for trusting you and keep it to yourself. If a student needs help, the school psychologist or social worker will be available and the information will be kept confidential.

(Taken from a university Safe Haven manual. Picture source unknown.)

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